MRA Consultants has been trading for over 20 years, during this time I have built up a reputation for service, reliability and value for money. A small sample of local business I serve include  Maryport Bodyworks Centre, ABI Motor body Repairs, Taylors Joinery And Plastics, West Cumbria domestic Violence, Distington Community Centre, Macs Removals Ltd .Engineering Pipework Services Ltd, Distington club for young people, Ewanrigg Community Centre, CMS, Robin Dargavel Ltd, Lake District Coast Aquarium as well as countless numbers of individuals. Over 99% of my business comes from referrals. I was the first in the area to pioneer no fix no fee and no call out charges.

Virus Bulletin news

Vawtrak trojan spread through malicious Office macros

Users easily tricked, but plenty of opportunity for the malware to be blocked.

Researchers at Trend Micro report that the 'Vawtrak' banking trojan now also spreads through Office macros, embedded in documents that are attached to spam emails.

Vawtrak rose to prominence late last year, when it broadened its scope from targeting Japanese banking users (only) to targeting users from banks in many other countries, leading to suggestions that it posed a challenge to Zeus for the title of 'king of botnets'. Last month, we published a thorough analysis of the malware by Fortinet researcher Raul Alvarez.

Last year, cybercriminals rediscovered the use of Office macros to spread malware. Prevalent in the late 1990s, macro viruses disappeared quickly when newer versions of Microsoft Office had macros disabled by default. However, malware authors have recently started to use social engineering to trick users into enabling macros, thus allowing the malicious code to be executed.

Sophos researcher Gabor Szappanos was one of the first to notice the resurgence of macro malware; he wrote an article for Virus Bulletin on the subject in July last year. Since then, the use of macros by malware has continued to increase.

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VB2015 conference programme announced

From drones to elephants: an exciting range of topics will be covered in Prague.

In six months' time, security researchers from around the world will gather in Prague for the 25th Virus Bulletin conference. Today we are excited to reveal the conference programme.

As every year, the selection committee's task was very difficult with some tough choices to be made, and there were some high quality submissions among the two thirds that didn't make it onto this year's programme.

The VB2015 programme includes 38 papers on a wide range of security topics. As in previous years, the presentations will run in two parallel streams and the programme includes both technical and less technical presentations.

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Paper: a timeline of mobile botnets

Ruchna Nigam provides an overview of more than 60 mobile malware families.

The rise of mobile malware is still a relatively recent thing, with the first actual mobile botnets not appearing until the beginning of this decade.

However, since then things have changed quickly, and today there are more than one million known mobile malware samples (though not families) in existence and mobile malware is almost as common as malware targeting desktops (even if there are some fundamental differences between the two).

Today, we publish a paper by Fortinet researcher Ruchna Nigam, in which she presents a timeline of mobile botnets.

Not only does Ruchna list more than 60 mobile botnets (including well-known names such as Zitmo, NotCompatible, Xsser and DroidKungFu) and provide basic information on all of them, she also takes a closer look at some particularly interesting variants.

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Paper: Dylib hijacking on OS X

Patrick Wardle shows how OS X is also vulnerable to once common Windows attacks.

A few years ago, DLL hijacking on Windows was really hot, despite the fact that the concept had been discussed by none other than the NSA as far back as 1998.

Many applications load dynamic link libraries (DLLs) without specifying a path name to indicate where the library is to be found in the operating system. When such a path name is absent, the operating system looks for the DLL file in a number of well-defined directories. An attacker could thus 'hijack' the DLL by placing a rogue DLL file into one of those directories, so that the operating system will find the rogue DLL first.

Patching vulnerabilities and the introduction of a number of OS-level mitigations has made DLL hijacking much less of an issue on Windows these days. But could other operating systems, such as Mac OS X, be vulnerable to a similar kind of attack?

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Paper: Windows 10 patching process may leave enterprises vulnerable to zero-day attacks

Aryeh Goretsky gives advice on how to adapt to Windows 10's patching strategy.

Patching is hard, especially when the code base is old and the bugs are buried deeply. This was highlighted once again this week when Microsoft released a patch for a vulnerability that was thought to have been patched almost five years ago, but which could still be exploited.

In fact, six out of the last eight Patch Tuesdays have included patches that have caused problems for some Windows users.

Probably in response to this reality, Microsoft has announced a slightly different approach to patching for its upcoming Windows 10 operating systems. The changes include a new Long Term Servicing (LTS) branch, as well as the use of 'fast' and 'slow' release cycles.

Today, we publish an article by ESET researcher Aryeh Goretsky, who takes a close look at these changes and their consequences for Windows 10 users. He also gives some recommendations on how to adapt to this new patching strategy.

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